Flooding from record rains kills 11 in Tennessee; oil spill update

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 13:52 GMT le 03 mai 2010

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Nashville, Tennessee remains virtually paralyzed this morning thanks to that city's heaviest recorded 1-day and 2-day rainfall in its history. A remarkable 7.25" of rain fell on the city Sunday, breaking the record for most rain in a single day (previously 6.60", set September 13, 1979.) Nashville's third greatest day of rainfall on record occurred Saturday, when 6.32" fell. Nashville also eclipsed its greatest 6-hour and 12-hour rainfall events on record, with 5.57" and 7.20", respectively, falling on Sunday. And, remarkably, only 2 days into the month, May 2010 is already the wettest May on record for Nashville.

Rainfall records were smashed all across Tennessee and Kentucky, with amounts as high as 17.73" recorded at Camden, TN, and 17.02" at Brownsville, TN. According to Chris Burt, the author of the excellent book Extreme Weather, the 13.30" that fell on Camden in 24 hours just missed eclipsing the state's all-time 24-hour precipitation record, the 13.60" inches that fell on Milan on September 13, 1982. Jackson, Tennessee had its rainiest day in its 63-year weather history on Sunday, 7.93". Bowling Green, Kentucky had its heaviest 2-day precipitation event on record, 9.67". Records in Bowling Green go back to 1870. The University of Wisconsin GOES Satellite Blog has some excellent imagery showing the remarkable plume of tropical moisture that crossed over Central America from the Eastern Pacific and fed the record rains.


Figure 1. Radar estimated rainfall for May 1 - 2, 2010 from the Nashville, Tennessee radar. A large region of the Tennessee and Kentucky received over ten inches of rain, with many areas receiving more than fifteen inches.


Figure 2. Flood forecast for the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. Image credit: NOAA.

The record rains triggered massive flooding that has killed at least eleven people in Tennessee, with two missing. The Cumberland River in downtown Nashville has surged to a height of 51', which is 11' over flood height, and the highest level the river has reached since a flood control project was completed in the early 1960s. The river is expected to crest this afternoon at 11.5' above flood stage, bringing flood waters to a large portion of the downtown area. The mayor has ordered all schools, parks, and libraries closed today, and commuter bus and train services have also been suspended. Five people died in Nashville due to the flooding. The Harpeth River at Bellevue, Tennessee to its greatest flood height since record keeping began in 1921. The river had a depth of 2 feet early Saturday morning before the rains began, and was running at a depth of 29' early this morning, breaking the record of 24.34' set in 1948. (To check out the flood heights, use our wundermap for Nashville with the "USGS River" layer turned on.) The Duck River at Hurricane Mills reached 28.7' yesterday morning before its streamgage stopped operating, its 2nd greatest flood height since record keeping began in 1926 (record: 30.7' in 1948.)

The record rains were accompanied by a surge of very warm air that set record high temperature marks at 21 major airports across the Eastern U.S. on Saturday; 19 more records were set on Sunday. This is not surprising, since more moisture can evaporate into warmer air, making record-setting rainfall events more likely when record high temperatures are present.


Figure 3. A portable classroom building from a nearby high school floats past submerged cars on I-24 near Nashville, TN on May 1, 2010. One person died in the flooding in this region of I-24. Roughly 200 - 250 vehicles got submerged on this section of I-24, according to wunderphotographer laughingjester, who was a tow truck operator called in to clear out the stranded vehicles.

Funding issues to take 17 Tennessee streamgages offline
According to the USGS web site, seventeen Tennessee streamflow gages with records going back up to 85 years will stop collecting data on July 1 because of budget cuts. With up to thirteen people in Tennessee dying from flooding this weekend, now hardly seems to be the time to be skimping on monitoring river flow levels by taking 17 of Tennessee's 94 streamflow gages out of service. These gages are critical for proper issuance of flood warnings to people in harm's way. Furthermore, Tennessee and most of the northern 2/3 of the U.S. can expect a much higher incidence of record flooding in coming decades. This will be driven by two factors: increased urban development causing faster run-off, and an increase in very heavy precipitation events due to global warming. Both factors have already contributed to significant increases in flooding events in recent decades over much of the U.S. According the landmark 2009 U.S. Climate Impact Report from the U.S. Global Change Research Program, "the amount of rain falling in the heaviest downpours has increased approximately 20 percent on average in the past century, and this trend is very likely to continue, with the largest increases in the wettest places." The USGS web site advertises that users who can contribute funding for the non-Federal share of costs to continue operation of these streamgages should contact Shannon Williams of the USGS Tennessee Water Science Center at 615-837-4755 or swilliam@usgs.gov. Tennessee is not the only state with streamgages at risk of closing down; fully 276 gages in 37 states have been shut down or will be shut down later this year (Figure 4.)


Figure 4. Streamgages that have been discontinued or are being considered for discontinuation or for conversion from continuous record discharge to stage-only stations. Funds for these 276 threatened streamgages are from the U.S. Geological Survey and other Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies. For those streamgages that have already been discontinued, extensive efforts were made to find another funding source; however, when no funding was made available the streamgages had to be discontinued. For those streamgages at risk for discontinuation, the current funding source has indicated that it can no longer fund the streamgage. Efforts are currently underway to identify another funding source for the operation of these streamgages; however, if no funding is identified, then these streamgages will have to be discontinued also. If you have questions about specific streamgages, click on the state of concern on the USGS web page of threatened stream gages.

Oil spill update
The oil slick from the April 20 explosion and blowout of the offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon has retreated from the coast, thanks to a slackening of the persistent onshore winds that have affected the northern Gulf of Mexico over the past week. Onshore winds of 10 - 15 knots will continue today, according to the latest NWS marine forecast, then shift to sideshore (out of the west) on Tuesday, as a cold front passes. Winds will then resume a weak onshore flow at 5 - 10 knots, Wednesday through Friday. These winds should cause only a slow transport of the oil slick towards the coast. I don't expect the spill will affect any land areas for the remainder of the week, with the possible exception of the mouth of the Mississippi River in Louisiana and the Chandeleur Islands. The latest forecast of Gulf currents from the NOAA HYCOM model (see also this alternative view of the HYCOM ocean current forecast) show weak ocean currents affecting the region during the remainder of the week. These currents will not be strong enough to push any oil southwards into the Loop Current over the next five days, so the Keys and South Florida are safe from oil for now.


Figure 5. Previous location and forecast location for tomorrow of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Image credit: NOAA Office of Response and Restoration. See also the trajectory maps available at State of Louisiana web site.

Jeff Masters

Flooding on I-24 (XMLP)
Flooding on I-24
Lick Creek Bridge (Wingman100)
God is cleaning out the creek and I think making a statement about cleanliness
Lick Creek Bridge
Removing the flood damaged cars and trucks. (laughingjester)
I am a wrecker driver for Martin's wrecker service. We were called to remove the vehicles that got caught in the flooding on interstate I 24 westbound near the Bell Road exit in Nashville Tennessee. Of course this is after the waters had subsided. It was roughly 200, 250 cars and trucks that got caught up in the flood. The debris to left is actually the remnants of a portable classroom that floated alongside the interstate and eventually rolled over and disintegrated.
Removing the flood damaged cars and trucks.

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Quoting hurricanejunky:


That's why I found it interesting because there has been much mention of similarities between recent busy hurricane seasons in forecasts for this season.

IIRC someone mentioned a few weeks ago that this season has the added "advantage" of several years of above average rainfall in the Sahara, meaning less dust over the Atlantic to inhibit development/strengthening. Crossing fingers that we don't reach the Greek names again...
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Sobering news DRM. :(
Member Since: 15 août 2008 Posts: 10 Comments: 3665
Quoting hurricanejunky:


That's why I found it interesting because there has been much mention of similarities between recent busy hurricane seasons in forecasts for this season.

yeah, it is a worry ain't it.
Goodnight all. stay safe
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Jerry...you have mail!!!
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8 presslord "aspectre...Why does my handle appear whenever you post a graphic?"

Laziness. Mostly just changing a consolidation of old postings to reflect current dates and maps...
...And giving credit where credit is due. You were the first one to inform the blog that the new estimate was 5000barrels per day rather than BritishPetroleum's "1000barrels per day".

Though now that I look at it, perhaps quoting your words in italics, while quoting mine in plain-text but without attribution, is less clear than it seemed when I originally pieced together the form.
So I'll edit the commentary to make clear that aspectre wrote post1043.

If you desire, I'll remove your name, though I'd like to leave the blog&post numbers unless you wish those to be removed also.
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Quoting seajunkie:
Good Morning all!!!

My name is Dave, I am a former U.S. Coast Guardsman and I am a CATastrophe Insurance Claims Adjuster. I believe my purpose on this Earth is to help people and serve my neighbors. So here goes:

I think that it is a fair assumption that this will be an active hurricane season.

PLEASE take a look at your homeowner's insurance policy. Call your insurance agent, even if you don't know him, and ask questions about your coverages on your policy. Know what is and what is not covered. Know what your deductible is. Make a list beforehand and ask as many questions as you can think of. That is what he is there for. He is there for more than sending you a card in the mail at Christmas time. He and his staff should be glad to help you. You can make adjustments to your policy which will be in effect immediately. If the agent or his staff is unhelpful, find another agent. It is easy to change your agent of record. Just call the inurance carrier.

Too many times I go to a claim and the insured has no knowledge of what is covered. After the disaster has happened is not the time to be looking for answers. Chances are your agent's office and home was hit by the disaster too, and he is taking care of his family and his office will be closed.

Gather up your family's important documents (birth certificates, deeds, car titles, immunization records, precious jewelry) and put them in a secured safety deposit box. The shoe box or small safe in your home will not keep them safe in case of water exposure, or if they get blown away in a Cat. 5 hurricane. Also ask the bank for a deposit box that is well off of the ground. The documents will be safer in an elevated safety deposit box.

Gather invoices or receipts from your high valued items (plasma t.v., electronics, guns) and put them in the safety deposit box. This way if these items are lost there is a baselined value for what they were once worth new.

About guns, write down all serial numbers and take pictures of each weapon for documentation.

Also in your shed or your garage, store your gas and electric powered tools or anything of value at least 4 feet off of the ground. In a big surge all bets are off, but many times I have seen storing things 1-2 feet higher would have made a difference.

Please be proactive. Truly an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure in a disaster situation. Once a storm hits, it is too late to start asking questions, you will be in shock and overwhelmed. It will be a VERY emotional time and clear thought may be elusive for a while.

Right before a storm, responsibly pull out as much cash as you can. The local ATM machines will most likely be down as there will be no power and they will be damaged.

In regards to cash money, cash money is uninsurable. If you lose cash it is gone. There is no way to prove how much you had. Keep all cash with you in a bag that stays with you when you leave the area. Be disceet with your wad of cash. Crooks survive storms too.

Don't put this off, as the ones you will be hurting will be your family.

I hope that this helps someone. If the worst happens, just know that we me and others like me will immediately be on the way to help you. Dispite what is commonly thought, adjusters are there to help you get through the mess.

God bless, and good luck.

Dave


god bless you too dave. can you offer any info or wager a guess why my insurance comapny required me to place a chainlink fence around an above ground pool 1500 feet from the road, the entire ten acres fenced and cross fenced, no one can see it from any property line without hiking through dense woods and private property and said they would cancel my insurance if we didnt? hmmmm, it just happened to be when my mobile home became five years old. so god bless you too and all the other insurance comapnies in fla who will run like scalded ducks when we need something from YOU
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Good monring, waterwitch! You have WUMail
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Hey, HJ, how are you doing? Nice info there in your last couple of pposts...oddly, the the 7 worst seasons of 12 are all in the last decade; a pattern emerges, huh?
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Unreal! sst's are just part of the equation BUT ive never seen anything like this. 2c approaching the caribbean now.

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good morning everyone
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Quoting AussieStorm:

I hope we don't see a season like 2005 even though conditions could be like or above those of 2005.


That's why I found it interesting because there has been much mention of similarities between recent busy hurricane seasons in forecasts for this season.
Member Since: 28 août 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2895
Man....That frontal line is moving like molasses from Mobile towards Pensacola...
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Nashville Live Stream 4 Link just mentioned that they're going to "bleed" the dam to the west of town, to relieve pressure on dam.

Nashville mayor will hold a live news conference at 11 AM CDT today

The Pinnacle building in downtown Nashville, TN has 25 feet of water in the basement.


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Quoting hurricanejunky:
Seasons with the most named storms,1851-present

Rank/Year/Number of Storms
1. 2005 28
2. 1933 21
3. 1995 19
3. 1887 19
5. 1969 18
6. 2008 16
7. 2003 16
8. 1936 16
9. 2007 15
9. 2004 15
9. 2001 15
9. 2000 15

I hope we don't see a season like 2005 even though conditions could be like or above those of 2005.
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Quoting hurricanejunky:
Seasons with the most named storms,1851-present

Rank: Year: Number of Storms:
1. 2005 28
2. 1933 21
3. 1995 19
3. 1887 19
5. 1969 18
6. 2008 16
7. 2003 16
8. 1936 16
9. 2007 15
9. 2004 15
9. 2001 15
9. 2000 15


A season with 15 - 18 storms (as called for by CSU) would put the season pretty high up on the list....
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Seasons with the most named storms,1851-present

Rank/Year/Number of Storms
1. 2005 28
2. 1933 21
3. 1995 19
3. 1887 19
5. 1969 18
6. 2008 16
7. 2003 16
8. 1936 16
9. 2007 15
9. 2004 15
9. 2001 15
9. 2000 15
Member Since: 28 août 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2895
Thought this was good reading:

All Early Season (January - May) Named Storms

May 31, 2008: Tropical Storm Arthur
May 6, 2007: Subtropical Storm Andrea
April 18, 2003: Tropical Storm Ana
April 21, 1992: Subtropical Storm 1
May 6, 1981: Tropical Storm Arlene
January 18, 1978: Subtropical Storm 1
May 21, 1976: Subtropical Storm 1
May 23, 1972: Subtropical Storm Alpha
May 17, 1970: Hurricane Alma (Category 1)
May 28, 1959: Tropical Storm Arlene
February 2, 1953: Tropical Storm Alice
May 25, 1952: Tropical Storm 1
May 15, 1951: Hurricane Able (Category 3)
May 22, 1948: Tropical Storm 1
May 19, 1940: Tropical Storm 1
May 27, 1934: Tropical Storm 1
May 14, 1933: Tropical Storm 1
May 5, 1932: Tropical Storm 1
May 13, 1916: Tropical Storm 1
May 24, 1908: Hurricane 2 (Category 1)
March 6, 1908: Hurricane 1 (Category 2)
May 27, 1890: Tropical Storm 1
May 16, 1889: Hurricane 1 (Category 1)
May 17, 1887: Tropical Storm 2
May 15, 1887: Tropical Storm 1
May 30, 1865: Tropical Storm 1
Member Since: 28 août 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2895
Mornin' Flood!
Member Since: 28 août 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2895
Good morning folks!

Thanks, Dr. Masters!

Seajunkie, you have WUMail...
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Almost forgot that today is the 11th anniversary of the 1999 OKC F5 tornado.

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Quoting seajunkie:
Good Morning all!!!

My name is Dave, I am a former U.S. Coast Guardsman and I am a CATastrophe Insurance Claims Adjuster. I believe my purpose on this Earth is to help people and serve my neighbors. So here goes:

I think that it is a fair assumption that this will be an active hurricane season.

PLEASE take a look at your homeowner's insurance policy. Call your insurance agent, even if you don't know him, and ask questions about your coverages on your policy. Know what is and what is not covered. Know what your deductible is. Make a list beforehand and ask as many questions as you can think of. That is what he is there for. He is there for more than sending you a card in the mail at Christmas time. He and his staff should be glad to help you. You can make adjustments to your policy which will be in effect immediately. If the agent or his staff is unhelpful, find another agent. It is easy to change your agent of record. Just call the inurance carrier.

Too many times I go to a claim and the insured has no knowledge of what is covered. After the disaster has happened is not the time to be looking for answers. Chances are your agent's office and home was hit by the disaster too, and he is taking care of his family and his office will be closed.

Gather up your family's important documents (birth certificates, deeds, car titles, immunization records, precious jewelry) and put them in a secured safety deposit box. The shoe box or small safe in your home will not keep them safe in case of water exposure, or if they get blown away in a Cat. 5 hurricane. Also ask the bank for a deposit box that is well off of the ground. The documents will be safer in an elevated safety deposit box.

Gather invoices or receipts from your high valued items (plasma t.v., electronics, guns) and put them in the safety deposit box. This way if these items are lost there is a baselined value for what they were once worth new.

About guns, write down all serial numbers and take pictures of each weapon for documentation.

Also in your shed or your garage, store your gas and electric powered tools or anything of value at least 4 feet off of the ground. In a big surge all bets are off, but many times I have seen storing things 1-2 feet higher would have made a difference.

Please be proactive. Truly an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure in a disaster situation. Once a storm hits, it is too late to start asking questions, you will be in shock and overwhelmed. It will be a VERY emotional time and clear thought may be elusive for a while.

Right before a storm, responsibly pull out as much cash as you can. The local ATM machines will most likely be down as there will be no power and they will be damaged.

In regards to cash money, cash money is uninsurable. If you lose cash it is gone. There is no way to prove how much you had. Keep all cash with you in a bag that stays with you when you leave the area. Be disceet with your wad of cash. Crooks survive storms too.

Don't put this off, as the ones you will be hurting will be your family.

I hope that this helps someone. If the worst happens, just know that we me and others like me will immediately be on the way to help you. Dispite what is commonly thought, adjusters are there to help you get through the mess.

God bless, and good luck.

Dave


Dave, you have WUMail...
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Quoting hydrus:
The flooding is bad Bordo.

Yes, flooding is catastrophic in areas. The Cumberland River is supposed to crest this afternoon and remain at that level from mid-day Monday through Wednesday, then quickly recede.

Thank God Nashville, TN completed a flood project on the Cumberland. There are still 2 or 3 streets in downtown Nashville, TN completely covered by flood waters!
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21. seajunky.

Very, very useful information. One minor thing to add. Family photos. I learned the hard way. Keep them high and dry. Cover them in case of leaks.

You should post more of your thoughts. It might help some of us who don't always think of those things.
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Quoting Bordonaro:
Update out of Nashville, TN:

Opryland Hotel, on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, TN is under 6 feet of water. All people have been evacuated safely.

The Opryland Mills Mall parking lots are completely flooded up to the mall entrance.

Briley Pkwy, HWY 155, a loop around Nashville, TN is closed on places.
The flooding is bad Bordo.
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today is may 3dr 1999 a few years to go today we had a big F5 in OK
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Unbelievable pictures.
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Thanks Dr.........Quite a start to 2010 thus far...Turns out El Nino might have been the least of our problems this year.
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Update out of Nashville, TN:

Opryland Hotel, on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, TN is under 6 feet of water. All people have been evacuated safely.

The Opryland Mills Mall parking lots are completely flooded up to the mall entrance.

Briley Pkwy, HWY 155, a loop around Nashville, TN is closed on places.

I lived in Nashville, TN briefly with my daughter. They are fantastic people, everyone needs to keep them in their prayers
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Quoting Stormchaser2007:
Nino 3.4 down to .5C or so.




EL Nino is overe
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21. seajunkie

Very good information. Made me thinking about raising the generator a couple of feet.

Thanks.
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We had some rain wedsday but the itz is retreating again
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Good Morning all!!!

My name is Dave, I am a former U.S. Coast Guardsman and I am a CATastrophe Insurance Claims Adjuster. I believe my purpose on this Earth is to help people and serve my neighbors. So here goes:

I think that it is a fair assumption that this will be an active hurricane season.

PLEASE take a look at your homeowner's insurance policy. Call your insurance agent, even if you don't know him, and ask questions about your coverages on your policy. Know what is and what is not covered. Know what your deductible is. Make a list beforehand and ask as many questions as you can think of. That is what he is there for. He is there for more than sending you a card in the mail at Christmas time. He and his staff should be glad to help you. You can make adjustments to your policy which will be in effect immediately. If the agent or his staff is unhelpful, find another agent. It is easy to change your agent of record. Just call the inurance carrier.

Too many times I go to a claim and the insured has no knowledge of what is covered. After the disaster has happened is not the time to be looking for answers. Chances are your agent's office and home was hit by the disaster too, and he is taking care of his family and his office will be closed.

Gather up your family's important documents (birth certificates, deeds, car titles, immunization records, precious jewelry) and put them in a secured safety deposit box. The shoe box or small safe in your home will not keep them safe in case of water exposure, or if they get blown away in a Cat. 5 hurricane. Also ask the bank for a deposit box that is well off of the ground. The documents will be safer in an elevated safety deposit box.

Gather invoices or receipts from your high valued items (plasma t.v., electronics, guns) and put them in the safety deposit box. This way if these items are lost there is a baselined value for what they were once worth new.

About guns, write down all serial numbers and take pictures of each weapon for documentation.

Also in your shed or your garage, store your gas and electric powered tools or anything of value at least 4 feet off of the ground. In a big surge all bets are off, but many times I have seen storing things 1-2 feet higher would have made a difference.

Please be proactive. Truly an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure in a disaster situation. Once a storm hits, it is too late to start asking questions, you will be in shock and overwhelmed. It will be a VERY emotional time and clear thought may be elusive for a while.

Right before a storm, responsibly pull out as much cash as you can. The local ATM machines will most likely be down as there will be no power and they will be damaged.

In regards to cash money, cash money is uninsurable. If you lose cash it is gone. There is no way to prove how much you had. Keep all cash with you in a bag that stays with you when you leave the area. Be disceet with your wad of cash. Crooks survive storms too.

Don't put this off, as the ones you will be hurting will be your family.

I hope that this helps someone. If the worst happens, just know that we me and others like me will immediately be on the way to help you. Dispite what is commonly thought, adjusters are there to help you get through the mess.

God bless, and good luck.

Dave
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Snow chance

An outbreak of cold weather over southeastern Australia may bring a flurry of snow later this week.

A strong cold front, accompanied by a deep low pressure system will blow a gale over TAS, VIC and alpine NSW. This will produce a combination of freezing conditions and plentiful moisture; the magic formula for snowfall.

Although it is unclear how extensive and prolonged this snow event will be, it appears likely that at least the peaks will witness some of the white stuff. Although May snow is not unheard of, good snowfall this early may boost confidence in the 2010 ski season.

© Weatherzone 2010
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Nino 3.4 down to .5C or so.

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Stormw when do you think we can expect things to get colder here in Belize or at least some rain ? Yesterday the temperature reached 106.7 at my house and its practical unbearable
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Good monday morning everybody horrible news coming from nashville and of course the oil spill hope it doesnt come to the tampa area.
Member Since: 8 avril 2010 Posts: 15 Comments: 2572
Quoting RTLSNK:


Go back and read page 17, two of our "friends" assumed you and I would know about something that happened in 1937. They are just jealous of our "experience". :)


The only thing I remember about 1937 was worrying about Amelia Earhart and planning for my 70th birthday. Other than that, my memory fails.
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Thanks Doc!
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Wow! Lots of news and none of it good! Happy Monday all!
Member Since: 28 août 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2895
When it comes to Heavy Rainfall,training cells and an overwhelmed community,one doesent have to be BELOW Sea Level,to flood and for lives to be lost.
Elevation means squat.

As this event shows us all to well.

"Turn around,DONT drown".

Its a motto for a heck of a good reason.

Best of luck and prayers to Tennessee.
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Good Morning Dr Masters and thank you for the update :o)
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I am originally from Tennessee, specifically Stewart County. I have been speaking with my mom who still lives there, and she has been telling me stories about the flooding. First off, 2 of those who died were from Stewart County. An elderly couple were driving in a car when it came to a bridge over a creek that was flooded. The water started moving their car so they tried to get out. The water swept them into the creek. Another person in a car behind them saw what happened and jumped in to try and rescue them. Unfortunately, the elderly woman and the man who was trying to rescue them drown. The elderly man pulled himself up to the bank of the creek and survived.

My mom was sharing what they were showing on the news this morning. Apparently there are many people in Nashville with boats, and when the water started rising on the city, they went out to start rescue people from their houses. Hopefully, this will keep the death toll low.

The beautiful Opryland Hotel has 6 feet of water in it, and there are images of communities with water to the roofs of the houses.

It is not just Nashville either. Many other cities and small towns alike are severely flooded, such as Clarksville. My mom works there and will be unable to make it to where she works because of the river flooding. If you have never been to Tennessee, it is full of creeks and rivers (My favorite part of I40 is when you cross the same creek 3 times). And as my mom told me, if you are anywhere near a creek or river, you are flooded.

The good people of this state are going to need our help and prayers.
Kelley

Live feed from Nashville
Link
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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