Wunderground launches new Local Climate Change section

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 18:10 GMT le 20 avril 2012

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In honor of Earth Day on Sunday, wunderground has launched a new Climate Change Center, which gives people resources to understand how the climate is changing both globally and in their local neighborhoods. I am particularly pleased with our Local Climate Change feature, which allows one to see how temperature and precipitation have changed over the past 100+ years at the nearest station with a long period of measurements. Predictions from climate models on what the next 100 years may bring are overlaid for each station. Data for most U.S. stations goes back to 1895; we have data for a few stations in Europe that extend back to the 1700s. Berlin has the longest period of record in this database, with data back to 1702.


Figure 1. Screenshot of the Local Climate Change page for Washington, DC. Measured temperatures since 1820 are shown in grey. By clicking on the "Show post-1900 trend:" box, we see that the trend since 1900 has been for an increase in temperature of 1.5°C (2.7°F) per century. Moving the thin vertical red line over the image using the mouse shows that the warmest year on record in Washington D.C. was 1991. Predictions for a future with low emissions of heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide are shown in yellow; the high emissions prediction is shown in red. Separate tabs are available to examine precipitation and snow.

Skeptical?
Also included in the new Climate Change Center is a section addressing the common skeptical arguments made against climate change. We offer three levels of explanation. The "Basic" level is the default, but one can also see more technical in-depth discussions by clicking on the "See All Explanation Levels" link. The material was developed by physicist John Cook for his excellent skepticalscience.com web site, which is widely referenced in the climate science communication community.


Video 1. I'm featured in this video on extreme weather and climate change done by veteran videographer Peter Sinclair for the Yale forum on Climate Change and the Media this month. I'm also featured in Part 1 of this series. Our new Climate Change Center has a section for climate change videos, which includes a twice-monthly feature from GreenTV detailing the world's notable wild weather events of the past two weeks.

Earth: the Operator's Manual airs Sunday night
Penn State climate scientist Dr. Richard Alley hosts parts II and III of Earth: the Operator's Manual on PBS beginning at 7pm Sunday, April 22--Earth Day. Part I of this excellent series aired in April 2011. The series gives an overview of climate change, but primarily focuses on what we can do to help slow down climate change though smart energy choices. Dr. Alley, a registered Republican, geologist, and former oil company employee, is the Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences at the Pennsylvania State University, and one of the most respected and widely published world experts on climate change. Dr. Alley has testified before Congress on climate change issues, served as lead author of "Chapter 4: Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground" for the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and is author of more than 170 peer-reviewed scientific articles on Earth's climate. He is also the author of a book I highly recommend--The Two Mile Time Machine, a superb account of Earth's climate history as deduced from the 2-mile long Greenland ice cores. Dr. Alley is an excellent and engaging speaker, and I highly recommend listening to his 45-minute keynote speech, "The Biggest Control Knob: CO2 in Earth's Climate History", given at the 2010 American Geophysical Union meeting, via this very watchable recording showing his slides as he speaks in one corner of the video. If you want to understand why scientists are so certain of the link between CO2 and Earth's climate, this is a must-see lecture.

Have a great weekend, everyone, and I'll be back Monday with a new post. I'd like to thank Wunderground meteorologist, Angela Fritz for spearheading the creating the new Climate Change Center; it's a product I'll be referring to frequently in the future, and one we'll be updating in the coming months with data on local sea level rise, fire risk, and drought.

Jeff Masters

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If you want to go by this... Low pressure is MUCH further to the north, not even in the Gulf... This would cause the threat for severe weather to increase and extend to Northern Florida. Models handled this very poorly. Just looking at the squall line, it's very dangerous, when you see dark colors in the Gulf, where you normally see them in Tropical Systems or Midwestern storms, you know these storms mean business.



Member Since: 1 juillet 2008 Posts: 13 Comments: 7415
Quoting presslord:
Is most of this gonna move by me (Charleston) offshore? Mucho thankso in advanceo!!!!!
It will be interetingo, you old geezero..:)
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Quoting presslord:


uh huh....


hehehe!
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Quoting Grothar:


It looks like the pressure will drop significantly as it approaches the Carolinas. You should get some heavy rain and wind :P



uh huh....
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
System Series Stage Age (Ma)
Quaternary Pleistocene Gelasian younger
Neogene Pliocene Piacenzian 2.588–3.600
Zanclean 3.600–5.332
Miocene Messinian 5.332–7.246
Tortonian 7.246–11.608
Serravallian 11.608–13.65
Langhian 13.65–15.97
Burdigalian 15.97–20.43
Aquitanian 20.43–23.03
Paleogene Oligocene Chattian older
Subdivision of the Neogene Period according to the IUGS, as of July 2009.

The Miocene (symbol MI[1]) is a geological epoch of the Neogene Period and extends from about 23.03 to 5.332 million years ago (Ma). The Miocene was named by Sir Charles Lyell. Its name comes from the Greek words μείων (meiōn, “less”) and καινός (kainos, “new”) and means "less recent" because it has 18% fewer modern sea invertebrates than the Pliocene. The Miocene follows the Oligocene Epoch and is followed by the Pliocene Epoch. The Miocene is the first epoch of the Neogene Period.

The earth went from the Oligocene Epoch through the Miocene and into the Pliocene as it cooled into a series of Ice Ages. The Miocene boundaries are not marked by a single distinct global event but consist rather of regional boundaries between the warmer Oligocene and the cooler Pliocene.

The plants and animals of the Miocene were fairly modern. Mammals and birds were well-established. Whales, seals, and kelp spread. At the end of this epoch, the Himalayas started to rise.A reconstruction of Earth as it appeared during the Miocene, around 20 million years ago.The Miocene or "less recent" is so called because it contains fewer modern animals than the following, Pliocene, epoch. The Miocene lasted about 18 million years, making it the second longest epoch of the Cenozoic era. This was a huge time of transition, the end of the old prehistoric world and the birth of the more recent sort of world. It was also the high point of the age of mammals.
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Quoting Xyrus2000:


Actually, there is no likely about it when it comes to the increase in CO2. We ARE the source. The amount of increase year over year has been roughly half of our carbon emissions, with the other half or so of our emissions absorbed by carbon sinks (mostly the ocean, which is why it is acidifying). We will break 400 ppm within the next couple of years, which is something that hasn't happened since the Miocene some 20 million years ago.

Interesting times ahead to be sure.


I have a theory that Crocodiles and Alligators may experience accelerated growth in global warming conditions. I have been informed that they like very warm water, and can supposedly grow as much as an order of magnitude faster depending on the temperature of the water.

Mammals, on the other hand, should tend to have their growth rates and maximum sizes inhibited by extreme heat.
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Quoting presslord:
Is most of this gonna move by me (Charleston) offshore? Mucho thankso in advanceo!!!!!


It looks like the pressure will drop significantly as it approaches the Carolinas. You should get some heavy rain and wind :P

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Quoting FLWeatherFreak91:
This doesn't appear to be shaping up with any of the model solutions...


The squall line is clearly seen on satellite.. Models are models.. Reality is, a squall line has formed, a very dangerous one at that, IR colors are very deep.
Member Since: 1 juillet 2008 Posts: 13 Comments: 7415
2012 has been windier than average compared to normal.This time around it shouldn't be dry winds.Thank goodness.The fire danger was surly high.
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Quoting reedzone:
Looking in the Gulf, a dangerous squall line has formed and is moving east... Head east of there, that's where the severe weather will strike. Good news is that it looks like it will be before the overnight hours.
This doesn't appear to be shaping up with any of the model solutions...
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Is most of this gonna move by me (Charleston) offshore? Mucho thankso in advanceo!!!!!
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Quoting nigel20:
Looking at the CO2 concentration on the climate page...you can see that we are at level not see in over 600000 years and there are no noticable increase in volcanic activity...the more likely culprit would be man-made climate change


Actually, there is no likely about it when it comes to the increase in CO2. We ARE the source. The amount of increase year over year has been roughly half of our carbon emissions, with the other half or so of our emissions absorbed by carbon sinks (mostly the ocean, which is why it is acidifying). We will break 400 ppm within the next couple of years, which is something that hasn't happened since the Miocene some 20 million years ago.

Interesting times ahead to be sure.
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Quoting Grothar:
If this system moves into the Northeast the winds will not be like a typical Nor'easter.

This is true.
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Quoting sonofagunn:
Question about the Florida severe weather - where is the squall line that will have the severe weather? Is it the line forming South of New Orleans/MS right now, that is connected to the low? Or is it the mess South of Panama City?


The low is fairly close to my house and the rain isn't moving a ton but I think the squall line is in te gulf
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Quoting sonofagunn:
Question about the Florida severe weather - where is the squall line that will have the severe weather? Is it the line forming South of New Orleans/MS right now, that is connected to the low? Or is it the mess South of Panama City?


There is a line in the Gulf of Mexico 220 miles West of the FL West Coast, but depending upon how much sun breaks though the cloud deck today there may be super cells that form in advance of that this afternoon/evening.
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If this system moves into the Northeast the winds will not be like a typical Nor'easter.

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Quoting washingtonian115:
Ahhh!.It's the invasion of the Floridians!.


Here washingtonian. This is from all of us to you!

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Question about the Florida severe weather - where is the squall line that will have the severe weather? Is it the line forming South of New Orleans/MS right now, that is connected to the low? Or is it the mess South of Panama City?
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Barometric Pressure is down to 1007.8 here. Looks like a lot depends on how much the cloud deck breaks today, or if it does. Highest severe % I've seen in a while though.
Member Since: 18 décembre 2006 Posts: 7 Comments: 2687
Quoting washingtonian115:
Ahhh!.It's the invasion of the Floridians!.


Wait until anything above a TS hits Florida.
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Quoting MAweatherboy1:
Has anyone else seen the insane levels of Cape the 6z GFS is suggesting 114 hours from now?



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Quoting hydrus:
Its payback for all the snowbirds they get every winter..:)
Lol.
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Quoting washingtonian115:
Ahhh!.It's the invasion of the Floridians!.
Its payback for all the snowbirds they get every winter..:)
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Looking in the Gulf, a dangerous squall line has formed and is moving east... Head east of there, that's where the severe weather will strike. Good news is that it looks like it will be before the overnight hours.
Member Since: 1 juillet 2008 Posts: 13 Comments: 7415
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Ahhh!.It's the invasion of the Floridians!.
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It's funny how I'm north of the slight risk and it's all clear outside.. Nice SPC... Slight risk needs to be adjusted north next update.
Member Since: 1 juillet 2008 Posts: 13 Comments: 7415
Quoting MAweatherboy1:
Has anyone else seen the insane levels of Cape the 6z GFS is suggesting 114 hours from now?

Cape now.
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84 hours.
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Has anyone else seen the insane levels of Cape the 6z GFS is suggesting 114 hours from now?

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Seeing the sun poke out in my area occasionally this AM.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
As stated last evening, if this forecast bears out, the two largest Northeast snowfalls of this past winter will have been in October and April--in fact, not actually during winter at all.

Yeah, they seem to be coming at the worst time for the trees and power companies this year
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Good deck of clouds across south florida keeping the heating of the sun down should limit the the threat for severe weather throughout the day but not completely wipe it out.
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Quoting Thundercloud01221991:
Come on really???? why do we have to go back to winter now



That is more then a foot of snow here in western NY
As stated last evening, if this forecast bears out, the two largest Northeast snowfalls of this past winter will have been in October and April--in fact, not actually during winter at all.
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The pattern is starting to resemble a El nino all right.I just hope it's weak.
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Quoting Thundercloud01221991:
Come on really???? why do we have to go back to winter now



That is more then a foot of snow here in western NY


Yep. Poor trees that have already bloomed.
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Check back later. Gonna take a Family walk before the rain kicks in this afternoon. Enjoy your morning North Florida and get your outside chores done by this afternoon.
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Quoting seflagamma:
Hi Cathy!!!! good to see you here this Saturday morning! You getting rain also?


We only got about .20" last night but the day before yesterday we got 3.20". Currently not raining but I think that will probably change later :)
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Come on really???? why do we have to go back to winter now



That is more then a foot of snow here in western NY
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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